Category Archives: Education

New Program Molds HBCU Students into Tech Investors

An entrepreneur and co-founder of the Black Founders has launched HBCU.vc, a new program to teach students at the nation’s black colleges and universities how to become tech investors. Hadiyah Mujhid, founder and executive director of HBCU.vc, is partnering with several black investors who run some of Silicon Valley’s top venture firms to back the… Read More »

The TSU Riot, 50 years later

The TSU Riot of 1967 was a formative experience for many Houstonians swept up in the vast social changes of the ’60s. Fifty years later, though, a lack of historical markers or public recognition of the incident, official or otherwise, represents a kind of collective shrug towards reconciling that past. Local and national newspapers, including… Read More »

Is There Still a Place for HBCUs In Trump’s New America?

By most conservative estimates, the nation’s historically Black colleges and universities are on life support. A combination of gaps in federal and state funding, alumni contributions and student enrollment has many of the institutions in this essential portion of the Black education portfolio desperately seeking options, with several close to shutting their doors. While the… Read More »

Lessons On Race And Vouchers From Milwaukee

The Trump administration has made school choice, vouchers in particular, a cornerstone of its education agenda. This has generated lots of interest in how school voucher programs across the country work and who they benefit. The oldest school voucher program was created in Milwaukee in 1990 with a singular focus on African-American students living in… Read More »

Black students at Massachusetts charter school served detention, suspended from sports teams for wearing hair in braids

African-American teenage twins attending a Massachusetts charter school are being punished for wearing their hair in braids. Their parents say the school’s policy around how students are permitted to wear their hair is discriminatory, and unfairly targets black students. Maya and Deanna Cook, sophomores at the Mystic Valley Regional Charter School outside of Boston, were… Read More »

Cutting off the school-to-prison pipeline

“I am innocent.” These three words caught my attention as I watched “Time: The Kalief Browder Story,” a six-part documentary series that aired on SpikeTV throughout the month of March to the beginning of April. Browder was only 16 years old when he was arrested for allegedly stealing a backpack and sent to the Rikers… Read More »