The Radical Practicality of Reparations

By | June 4, 2014

David Frum has posted a rebuttal to my argument in favor of reparations. I appreciate David’s engagement with the issue. I often miss the old days when The Atlantic’s writers would engage each other in running debate, so I’m happy for the chance to get back into that kind of conversation here.

On y va.

David grounds his rebuttal in The Philadelphia Plan, an affirmative action program which David believes qualifies as reparations. I disagree. The Philadelphia Plan was an attempt to end job discrimination among firms doing business with the federal government. Originally it was isolated to the building trades in Philadelphia. This was not a mistake. “The NAACP wanted a tougher require; the unions hated the whole thing,” said White House aide John Ehrlichman. “Before long, the AFL-CIO and the NAACP were locked in combat over one of the passionate issues of the day and the Nixon administration was located in the sweet and reasonable middle.”

The Plan’s proprietors showed little stomach for any kind of historical reckoning. President Richard Nixon’s Assistant Secretary of Labor Arthur Fletcher, who helped create the Plan, targeted not just blacks, but “Orientals, American Indians and persons with Spanish surnames.” (the Atlantic)

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