How Can Blacks Progress Financially?

By | November 28, 2012

A new infographic from personal finance site Online Loan 24 says African-American personal finance is “down, not out.”

What does that vague assessment mean? A lot of things, actually.

Using information obtained via two studies, “The State of the African-American Consumer” and “The African American Financial Experience” , both from 2011, Online Loan 24 attempts to depict a Black financial future that, while not rosy, isn’t too grim, either. But can we trust the infographic?

According to Online Loan 24, “African-Americans are disadvantaged in just about every area of personal finance.” Not only is Black unemployment still a big problem, but African-Americans who do work earn just 61 percent of what their white counterparts earn. From there, the problems cascade, says the infographic: Blacks are significantly less likely than whites to feel secure in their ability to afford daily expenses and their mortgage. Fifty-four percent of Black adults have no savings; that’s twice the percentage of white adults with no money in the bank. And, when it came to home ownership, only 50 percent of Blacks owned their homes compared to 70 percent of whites.

When they retire, as we’ve told you before, Blacks have a lot less money than whites, particularly because African-Americans tend to do things like dip into their 401(k)s to ease financial burdens in times of need. (BET)

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  • A public education is free. A person can learn even in a bad school, if they take personal responsibility for their learning. Practice using birth control. Teenagers who cannot read or count having babies almost certainly doom the child to a future of poverty in today’s economy. Stop wearing and driving everything you earn. In the end no one gives a damn if you have on designer clothes or you are driving an expensive car. Save some portion of your income every payday.

    Getting head is not difficult, but it appears that it is hard to stop being foolish.

    Signed
    Concerned black man